Video games are changing. With the growth of technology, there appear new characters, advanced visual effects, and more complicated plots. The same thing is happening to almost everything in the field of science and industry. However, some major change is occurring in the games far from the productive studios, in our homes and minds. We are talking about the way players start to interact with each other, creating a new web community of game-watchers.

There were numerous echoes of the game evolution from active playing too passive watching in the past. The same as in the time of ancient Rome people enjoyed watching gladiator games, in 1990-s kids gathered to watch the older boys playing “Street Fighter 2.” The popularity of corrida, Olympics Games and even the audience of an ordinary theatre demonstrates that an idea of watching someone play the game is not new, it just has a new aspect.

Live Streaming as a Part of Virtual Reality

The rise of online streaming and social sharing over the last years has been astronomic, and it is not surprising. In the world where almost everybody has a mobile phone with a camera and Internet connection, the emergence of live streaming web projects is inevitable: Periscope from Twitter, Twitch.tv, Life On Air Inc, “Histories” section in Instagram, etc. All these apps allow translating events in real-time mode and gathering an audience around by clicking one button. General Electric’s latest advertising company reflects this hot trend as well. They used drones flying over the company’s factory and broadcasting the audience a picture nobody had ever seen before.

Watch the video: General Electric has proven itself to be a brand open to experimenting.

Live streaming radically changes the world perception, allowing people to see things that happen right now in different places. Streaming holds a big promise for building the virtual reality. Not coincidentally, Amazon decided to make a good investment buying Twitch.tv, the biggest live streaming platform, in 2014. Every day, millions of users gather on Twitch to watch and translate games. Experts confirm that more than half of Twitch audience spends 20 hours per week watching other people playing. If this doesn’t convince you, here is one more undeniable data: 27 million people connect to Twitch to watch a “Counter-Strike: Global Offensive” tournament in 2015. Who are these people? And why they spend their time in such a way? Let’s see.

“Game-watchers” Community: Why Do People Enjoy Watching the Video Games Streaming?

At first view, it seems surprising why people spend so much time watching other people play games they could play themselves. However, the phenomenon of Twitch popularity demonstrates that watching the best players is more fun than participating as a novice. Like any sport, watching game streams can be addictive.

The Possibility to Know More about the Game

Popular streaming platforms have a great influence on consumer attitudes and behaviors. Game streaming reveals all advantages and disadvantages of the game and can help make a decision about purchasing the game. For many players, the game price (most of them go for $60) is considerable, and they don’t want to pay money for something they are nor really sure about. Watching a game trailer, reading reviews can help to make a purchase decision, however, seeing the game in action can tell much more. So, if you have your game channel, start thinking of it as a powerful marketing tool

Learning from Someone Else’s Experience

Sometimes, the game can be too complicated, making gamers watch games of someone more skilled who managed to pass the game to the end. Watching a master player for a few minutes can do more than playing the game in practice mode. You can help your viewers absorb some of your skills. Try to be interesting to your audience, play out different plots. You can do it on a special dedicated YouTube channel, Twitch.tv or other similar services.

Watching Games as a Hobby

The average age of compulsive players is already passed 35 and approaching 40. Most of them are busy well-to-do people who enjoy videogames, but have absolutely not time for playing, searching for new games, completing new levels, etc. For them, game streaming is the alternative way to get through the game and enjoy the overall game community atmosphere.

Gaming Championships

Just like most people watch World Cup or Superbowl, people spend time watching tournament streams. The possibility to watch live gaming championships is the main reason of subscribing for Twitch. People love observing professionals at the top of their games. For them, watching championships is a nice pastime and a kind of inspiration to improve their skills. If you are a professional gamer, don’t hesitate taking part in tournament games.

Watching a Talented Host

We usually watch talk shows because we enjoy the host of the program. The same happens with game streams. One of the most famous “Let’s Play” gamers on YouTube is a Swedish video blogger PewDiePie who makes millions of dollars every year from the ad revenue. His YouTube channel has the biggest amount of subscribers (more than 48 millions). What really makes people come back to PewDiePie’s channel is his charismatic personality. If you have good declamatory skills or a unique sense of humor, have ideas for your show and style, don’t miss a chance to grab the attention of watchers.

Take a look at the video explaining why to watch other people playing games:

Take Away

In spite of criticism concerning video game streaming, the popularity of online streamers is out of a question. With the increasing network bandwidth, streaming has become an integral part of our lives. As awkward and controversial as it may seem, live streaming services embody the future of entertainment and journalism, where everyone is a broadcaster and editor all in one. In combination with virtual reality, streaming can dramatically change our nearest future: the possibility to beam up to the front row of the Broadway Theater or final of football World Cup in a twinkle of an eye doesn’t seem unreal anymore.